Past Issues

Current Issue

Browse By Topic

The Magazine of Lenoir-Rhyne University

The Magazine of Lenoir-Rhyne University

Learn More

Explore the rich tradition and history of Lenoir-Rhyne by browsing news, accomplishments, and athletic highlights through the years.

Archives

Explore the rich tradition and history of Lenoir-Rhyne by browsing news, accomplishments, and athletic highlights through the years.Explore Archives
Issue 3
Issue 3
Fall 2019
Issue 2
Issue 2
Spring 2019
Issue 1
Issue 1
Fall 2018
Issue 3
Issue 3
Summer 2018
Issue 2
Issue 2
Spring 2018
SEEDS: NEW STUDENT ORGANIZATION DEDICATED TO SUSTAINABILITY

Lenoir-Rhyne’s School of Natural Sciences has created a new student organization: Strategies for Ecology Education, Diversity, and Sustainability. It is an official chapter of the program of the Ecological Society of America. 

Lenoir-Rhyne’s School of Natural Sciences has created a new student organization: Strategies for Ecology Education, Diversity, and Sustainability. It is an official chapter of the program of the Ecological Society of America. 

SEEDS of LR aims to encourage student interest in the environment, while providing a supportive community for students underrepresented in ecological fields of biology. The organization inspires students to participate in activities and events that will enhance their understanding and appreciation of the natural world. Additionally, SEEDS of LR provides visibility for minority groups in ecological fields through workshops, speakers, and highlighted scientists. 

Carly York, Ph.D., assistant professor of biology, said SEEDS of LR offers students opportunities to explore the fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. 

“Many undergraduates only know of biology career paths that lead to medical fields,” York said. “This organization will provide students with the opportunity to learn more about the environment and career opportunities within ecological fields. SEEDS of LR is not limited to biology majors, and we encourage student participation from anyone interested in nature, regardless of discipline.” 

Selina Cortez, a senior biology major from Maiden, North Carolina, is the founding president of SEEDS of LR chapter. “We have a nature preserve on campus and through SEEDS, we are building awareness among Lenoir-Rhyne students,” Cortez said. “This year, we’ve organized a seed bombing with native seeds and fertilizers to pollinate in the area among other activities. We want LR and the community to know that we are here.” 

Selina Cortez, senior in biology, is holding a tarantula during her recent participation at the 13th Annual SEEDS Leadership Meeting. Cortez was selected as one of 20 students from institutions such as Princeton University and University of California Berkeley to attend the meeting. 



In September 2018, Cortez traveled to the 13th Annual SEEDS Leadership Meeting at Southwestern Research Station in Portal, Arizona. Students had to be nominated to attend, and Cortez was one of 20 students selected from schools that included Princeton University and University of California Berkeley. During the conference, Cortez focused on lack of water regulation in the state of Arizona. She participated in catching bats in mist nets, catching lizards for the data collection of a doctorate student, carrying tarantulas, and a night hike hunting for rattlesnakes. She also ate breakfast with the national president of Ecological Society of America and learned about the biodiversity of the Sky Islands and the Chiricahua Desert. 

“It was an honor to represent Lenoir-Rhyne,” Cortez said. “This opportunity will allow me to network and focus on border ecology to include learning about wildlife management and politics.” 

During the spring semester, Cortez will research stingray stress responses dependent on human interaction to support her long-term goal to become a conservation biologist. She says LR has contributed to her success both as a leader and a student. 

“Lenoir-Rhyne has developed me in the liberal arts as a well-rounded individual,” Cortez said. “I also love the personalization of LR academics. I am thankful for all my instructors who go out of their way to make sure I am career-ready and that I understand the material. That is what makes LR so amazing.” 

  • Student Life
SEEDS: NEW STUDENT ORGANIZATION DEDICATED TO SUSTAINABILITY
Leslie Ellis

Lenoir-Rhyne’s School of Natural Sciences has created a new student organization: Strategies for Ecology Education, Diversity, and Sustainability. It is an official chapter of the program of the Ecological Society of America. 

SEEDS of LR aims to encourage student interest in the environment, while providing a supportive community for students underrepresented in ecological fields of biology. The organization inspires students to participate in activities and events that will enhance their understanding and appreciation of the natural world. Additionally, SEEDS of LR provides visibility for minority groups in ecological fields through workshops, speakers, and highlighted scientists. 

Carly York, Ph.D., assistant professor of biology, said SEEDS of LR offers students opportunities to explore the fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. 

“Many undergraduates only know of biology career paths that lead to medical fields,” York said. “This organization will provide students with the opportunity to learn more about the environment and career opportunities within ecological fields. SEEDS of LR is not limited to biology majors, and we encourage student participation from anyone interested in nature, regardless of discipline.” 

Selina Cortez, a senior biology major from Maiden, North Carolina, is the founding president of SEEDS of LR chapter. “We have a nature preserve on campus and through SEEDS, we are building awareness among Lenoir-Rhyne students,” Cortez said. “This year, we’ve organized a seed bombing with native seeds and fertilizers to pollinate in the area among other activities. We want LR and the community to know that we are here.” 

Selina Cortez, senior in biology, is holding a tarantula during her recent participation at the 13th Annual SEEDS Leadership Meeting. Cortez was selected as one of 20 students from institutions such as Princeton University and University of California Berkeley to attend the meeting. 



In September 2018, Cortez traveled to the 13th Annual SEEDS Leadership Meeting at Southwestern Research Station in Portal, Arizona. Students had to be nominated to attend, and Cortez was one of 20 students selected from schools that included Princeton University and University of California Berkeley. During the conference, Cortez focused on lack of water regulation in the state of Arizona. She participated in catching bats in mist nets, catching lizards for the data collection of a doctorate student, carrying tarantulas, and a night hike hunting for rattlesnakes. She also ate breakfast with the national president of Ecological Society of America and learned about the biodiversity of the Sky Islands and the Chiricahua Desert. 

“It was an honor to represent Lenoir-Rhyne,” Cortez said. “This opportunity will allow me to network and focus on border ecology to include learning about wildlife management and politics.” 

During the spring semester, Cortez will research stingray stress responses dependent on human interaction to support her long-term goal to become a conservation biologist. She says LR has contributed to her success both as a leader and a student. 

“Lenoir-Rhyne has developed me in the liberal arts as a well-rounded individual,” Cortez said. “I also love the personalization of LR academics. I am thankful for all my instructors who go out of their way to make sure I am career-ready and that I understand the material. That is what makes LR so amazing.” 

Current Issue

Issue 3
Fall 2019