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The Magazine of Lenoir-Rhyne University

The Magazine of Lenoir-Rhyne University

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Explore the rich tradition and history of Lenoir-Rhyne by browsing news, accomplishments, and athletic highlights through the years.

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Explore the rich tradition and history of Lenoir-Rhyne by browsing news, accomplishments, and athletic highlights through the years.Explore Archives
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Issue 1
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Summer 2018
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Spring 2018
Issue 1
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Fall 2017
MEET OUR FACULTY

Professors at Lenoir-Rhyne are more than experts in their field of study. They inspire students to explore new ideas, think critically, and engage the world in bold new ways. A sample of LR’s highly qualified and experienced faculty are highlighted here. 
 


Jesse McKee, Ph.D., has been named program coordinator for LR’s Master of Arts in Criminal Justice Leadership program, which launched this fall. 

Jesse McKee, Ph.D. - program coordinator of MA in Criminal Justice LeadershipMcKee has a doctorate degree in criminology and criminal justice and comes to LR after most recently serving as a professor in the department of sociology and criminal justice at Pfeiffer University. His experience in the criminal justice field includes work with the National Domestic Violence Fatality Review Initiative. McKee also has been involved with research projects related to juvenile justice, domestic violence, American-Indian tribal courts, high-risk sex offenders, and religion as it relates to prisoner misconduct. 

“I plan on inspiring Lenoir-Rhyne students in a way where they recognize that their leadership in the field of criminal justice is what can impact the communities they serve in many positive ways,” McKee said. “In a broader sense, this helps promote responsible leadership for service in the world which is part of Lenoir-Rhyne’s overall mission.” 

LR’s Master of Arts in Criminal Justice Leadership program is designed to prepare students for work in a variety of criminal justice administrative positions, including areas of local, state, and federal law enforcement, probation, courts, corrections, victim services, and criminal justice advocacy. According to McKee, LR’s program is unique because it incorporates leadership curriculum. “The practical nature of this program, with its emphasis on leadership, sets it apart from traditional criminal justice master’s programs,” he said. “I’m excited to help prepare Lenoir-Rhyne students for becoming leaders within various criminal justice agencies.” 


 


Brad Egan, OTD, Ph.D., CADC, OTR/L, is the occupational therapy program site coordinator and associate professor at LR’s Columbia Center. He has been a clinically certified occupational therapist for nearly 16 years and is also a certified alcohol and drug abuse counselor. 

Brad Egan, Occupational Therapy facultyBefore LR launched its Master of Science in OT program in Columbia, South Carolina, in fall 2017, Egan oversaw development of the program’s first cohort of students. 

“Overseeing development of the Columbia cohort involved making clinical relationships in the area, finding community clinical partners, and recruiting faculty,” said Egan, who also assisted with managing development of LR’s Health Sciences Center, a 20,000-square-foot classroom facility on Main Street in Columbia. LR’s OT program is housed in the facility, which has additional classroom space available for the needs of future degree programs. 

According to Egan, LR’s OT program is unique because it integrates clinical experiences with didactic learning throughout the course of the program. “The OT program at Lenoir-Rhyne has a strong focus on weaving clinical experiences with didactic learning all the way through,” he said. “For example, students start doing fieldwork their second semester, and unlike most programs, learners have their first Level 2 fieldwork halfway through the program.” 

Egan earned his first doctorate in occupational therapy from Creighton University in Omaha, Nebraska, and a second Doctor of Philosophy in Education degree from Northcentral University in Prescott, Arizona. His particular area of interest is occupational disruption and occupational re-engagement for individuals in recovery from substance use disorders. 


Daniel Grimm, Ph.D., is an assistant professor of biology who says he feels fortunate to have landed a faculty position at Lenoir-Rhyne in fall 2014. “It is a privilege to be part of a student’s academic journey to the career that he or she dreams about,” Grimm said. “It challenges me to help all my students gain the appropriate fundamental knowledge of microbiology they need to be successful on their chosen fields.” 

Daniel Grimm, Ph.D, assistant professor of biologyAccording to Grimm, LR also provides students in the field of biology an opportunity to participate in a research project of their choosing, lasting from one to four semesters. “One of the rewarding aspects of my responsibilities as a faculty member is being a part of the faculty team that oversees the many imaginative research projects our students undertake,” he said. “Students match their particular research interests with those of a faculty member in the School of Natural Sciences who then supervises the student’s work.” 

Grimm earned a Master of Science in Biology from Memphis State University in Memphis, Tennessee, and a doctorate degree in microbiology from North Carolina State University. He also completed an NIH postdoctoral research fellowship at Duke University Medical Center and continued working in the field of science research for several years to follow. Grimm has worked for the Illinois Institute of Technology, Duke University, the University of Tennessee and United States Department of Agriculture. 

“The subjects of my research projects ranged from isolating and characterizing antioxidant enzymes from mammalian lung tissue, to determining the chemical composition of oilseed, to developing a microbiological method for converting gypsum to elemental sulfur,” Grimm said. “As different as these projects were, each one was fascinating in its own right.” 

 

 


Kimberly Price, Ph.D., is assistant professor of public health at Lenoir-Rhyne’s Asheville Center. She is a Master-Certified Health Education Specialist with more than 15 years of experience in health promotion and community/public health. 

Kimberly Price, Ph.D, assistant professor for public health“My passion for the field of public health stems from wanting to make a difference in the lives of the most vulnerable,” Price said. “Seeing the effects of complications from chronic diseases like diabetes and cardiovascular disease on beloved relatives motivated me to pursue a career that would focus on prevention. Being proactive through health education is my way to serve.” 

Price graduated with a Master of Arts in Health Education from Teachers College, Columbia University in New York, New York, and a doctorate degree in health education with a concentration in epidemiology from the University of Cincinnati in Cincinnati, Ohio. 

At Lenoir-Rhyne, Price works to inspire students by providing opportunities for hands-on learning experiences. “I believe that students are truly inspired when they put what they have learned into action,” she said. “Our public health students work to complete hundreds of volunteer and internship hours at local nonprofits, create and promote public health campaigns, prepare policy reports, and conduct research projects to improve health outcomes.” 

LR’s MPH program is unique, said Price, because it offers a concentration in community health which allows students to graduate fully prepared for careers that provide service with impactful community benefit. “While the program focuses on personal health behavior, it also teaches students how to strategize with communities to develop programs that are sustainable,” she said. “The most satisfying aspect of my career has been seeing the results of evidence-based practices coupled with compassion.”


Tunay Oguz, Ph.D., is an active scholar and applied microeconomist who serves Lenoir-Rhyne as assistant professor of economics. She earned a Master of Business Administration in Finance from the Anderson School of Business and a doctorate degree in economics with a concentration in public finance and health economics from the University of New Mexico. 

Tunay Oguz, Ph.D., assistant professor of economicsOguz says her teaching approach involves instruction on economics that is applicable to the lives of her students. “My teaching approach engages students in activities that model how economic theories apply to real-world scenarios,” she said. “This allows students to see how the study of economics goes beyond an academic discipline and helps them understand how the principles of economics affects their everyday lives.” 

The majority of Oguz’s research focuses on minority access to health care services in the United States, particularly understanding and reducing the underlying mechanisms of racial, ethnic, and gender disparities in health and health care. She is committed to research that improves health in developing countries, and focuses primarily on how gender norms affect children’s well-being, reproductive health, and fertility. 

“Much of my research has taught me about the deep connections that exist between economics and human experience,” Oguz said. “My passion for the field comes from a desire to contribute to the well-being and happiness of others. I have found that students are also interested in academic and business careers that go beyond a discipline to make a positive difference in the world.”


Brent Driggers, Ph.D., is professor of new testament at Lenoir-Rhyne’s Lutheran Theological Southern Seminary in Columbia, South Carolina. He has been a professor at LTSS for more than a decade and serves as a Sunday school teacher and preacher at local congregations. 

Brent Driggers, Ph.D., professor of new testament at LTSS With a great love for the Christian theological tradition, Driggers works to empower his students by equipping them with an understanding of God’s love, how to find it in scripture, and communicate it to others. “I want my students to see how much the New Testament inspires and shapes who I am,” Driggers said. “I want them to see that these are not purely academic topics but living traditions that, when interpreted faithfully, shape us into the image of a loving God.” 

Driggers received an undergraduate degree in religion and English from Wake Forest University before earning a Master of Theological Studies degree at Duke University and a Master of Divinity degree and doctorate degree in New Testament at Princeton Theological Seminary in Princeton, New Jersey. He has published articles related to biblical studies and biblical theology, and regularly provides articles for academic and church-related publications. 

Much of the work Driggers requires of his students involves close analysis of passages in the New Testament Gospels. According to Driggers, students translate passages from the Greek language before analyzing the text with attention to narrative factors and relevant historical background. “With these assignments students begin to experience just how deep interpretation can go,” he said. “If they can learn to plumb the real depths of scripture, and to wrestle with its complexities and ambiguities, then they are on their way to mature pastoral ministry.”

 

  • Academics
MEET OUR FACULTY
LRU

Professors at Lenoir-Rhyne are more than experts in their field of study. They inspire students to explore new ideas, think critically, and engage the world in bold new ways. A sample of LR’s highly qualified and experienced faculty are highlighted here. 
 


Jesse McKee, Ph.D., has been named program coordinator for LR’s Master of Arts in Criminal Justice Leadership program, which launched this fall. 

Jesse McKee, Ph.D. - program coordinator of MA in Criminal Justice LeadershipMcKee has a doctorate degree in criminology and criminal justice and comes to LR after most recently serving as a professor in the department of sociology and criminal justice at Pfeiffer University. His experience in the criminal justice field includes work with the National Domestic Violence Fatality Review Initiative. McKee also has been involved with research projects related to juvenile justice, domestic violence, American-Indian tribal courts, high-risk sex offenders, and religion as it relates to prisoner misconduct. 

“I plan on inspiring Lenoir-Rhyne students in a way where they recognize that their leadership in the field of criminal justice is what can impact the communities they serve in many positive ways,” McKee said. “In a broader sense, this helps promote responsible leadership for service in the world which is part of Lenoir-Rhyne’s overall mission.” 

LR’s Master of Arts in Criminal Justice Leadership program is designed to prepare students for work in a variety of criminal justice administrative positions, including areas of local, state, and federal law enforcement, probation, courts, corrections, victim services, and criminal justice advocacy. According to McKee, LR’s program is unique because it incorporates leadership curriculum. “The practical nature of this program, with its emphasis on leadership, sets it apart from traditional criminal justice master’s programs,” he said. “I’m excited to help prepare Lenoir-Rhyne students for becoming leaders within various criminal justice agencies.” 


 


Brad Egan, OTD, Ph.D., CADC, OTR/L, is the occupational therapy program site coordinator and associate professor at LR’s Columbia Center. He has been a clinically certified occupational therapist for nearly 16 years and is also a certified alcohol and drug abuse counselor. 

Brad Egan, Occupational Therapy facultyBefore LR launched its Master of Science in OT program in Columbia, South Carolina, in fall 2017, Egan oversaw development of the program’s first cohort of students. 

“Overseeing development of the Columbia cohort involved making clinical relationships in the area, finding community clinical partners, and recruiting faculty,” said Egan, who also assisted with managing development of LR’s Health Sciences Center, a 20,000-square-foot classroom facility on Main Street in Columbia. LR’s OT program is housed in the facility, which has additional classroom space available for the needs of future degree programs. 

According to Egan, LR’s OT program is unique because it integrates clinical experiences with didactic learning throughout the course of the program. “The OT program at Lenoir-Rhyne has a strong focus on weaving clinical experiences with didactic learning all the way through,” he said. “For example, students start doing fieldwork their second semester, and unlike most programs, learners have their first Level 2 fieldwork halfway through the program.” 

Egan earned his first doctorate in occupational therapy from Creighton University in Omaha, Nebraska, and a second Doctor of Philosophy in Education degree from Northcentral University in Prescott, Arizona. His particular area of interest is occupational disruption and occupational re-engagement for individuals in recovery from substance use disorders. 


Daniel Grimm, Ph.D., is an assistant professor of biology who says he feels fortunate to have landed a faculty position at Lenoir-Rhyne in fall 2014. “It is a privilege to be part of a student’s academic journey to the career that he or she dreams about,” Grimm said. “It challenges me to help all my students gain the appropriate fundamental knowledge of microbiology they need to be successful on their chosen fields.” 

Daniel Grimm, Ph.D, assistant professor of biologyAccording to Grimm, LR also provides students in the field of biology an opportunity to participate in a research project of their choosing, lasting from one to four semesters. “One of the rewarding aspects of my responsibilities as a faculty member is being a part of the faculty team that oversees the many imaginative research projects our students undertake,” he said. “Students match their particular research interests with those of a faculty member in the School of Natural Sciences who then supervises the student’s work.” 

Grimm earned a Master of Science in Biology from Memphis State University in Memphis, Tennessee, and a doctorate degree in microbiology from North Carolina State University. He also completed an NIH postdoctoral research fellowship at Duke University Medical Center and continued working in the field of science research for several years to follow. Grimm has worked for the Illinois Institute of Technology, Duke University, the University of Tennessee and United States Department of Agriculture. 

“The subjects of my research projects ranged from isolating and characterizing antioxidant enzymes from mammalian lung tissue, to determining the chemical composition of oilseed, to developing a microbiological method for converting gypsum to elemental sulfur,” Grimm said. “As different as these projects were, each one was fascinating in its own right.” 

 

 


Kimberly Price, Ph.D., is assistant professor of public health at Lenoir-Rhyne’s Asheville Center. She is a Master-Certified Health Education Specialist with more than 15 years of experience in health promotion and community/public health. 

Kimberly Price, Ph.D, assistant professor for public health“My passion for the field of public health stems from wanting to make a difference in the lives of the most vulnerable,” Price said. “Seeing the effects of complications from chronic diseases like diabetes and cardiovascular disease on beloved relatives motivated me to pursue a career that would focus on prevention. Being proactive through health education is my way to serve.” 

Price graduated with a Master of Arts in Health Education from Teachers College, Columbia University in New York, New York, and a doctorate degree in health education with a concentration in epidemiology from the University of Cincinnati in Cincinnati, Ohio. 

At Lenoir-Rhyne, Price works to inspire students by providing opportunities for hands-on learning experiences. “I believe that students are truly inspired when they put what they have learned into action,” she said. “Our public health students work to complete hundreds of volunteer and internship hours at local nonprofits, create and promote public health campaigns, prepare policy reports, and conduct research projects to improve health outcomes.” 

LR’s MPH program is unique, said Price, because it offers a concentration in community health which allows students to graduate fully prepared for careers that provide service with impactful community benefit. “While the program focuses on personal health behavior, it also teaches students how to strategize with communities to develop programs that are sustainable,” she said. “The most satisfying aspect of my career has been seeing the results of evidence-based practices coupled with compassion.”


Tunay Oguz, Ph.D., is an active scholar and applied microeconomist who serves Lenoir-Rhyne as assistant professor of economics. She earned a Master of Business Administration in Finance from the Anderson School of Business and a doctorate degree in economics with a concentration in public finance and health economics from the University of New Mexico. 

Tunay Oguz, Ph.D., assistant professor of economicsOguz says her teaching approach involves instruction on economics that is applicable to the lives of her students. “My teaching approach engages students in activities that model how economic theories apply to real-world scenarios,” she said. “This allows students to see how the study of economics goes beyond an academic discipline and helps them understand how the principles of economics affects their everyday lives.” 

The majority of Oguz’s research focuses on minority access to health care services in the United States, particularly understanding and reducing the underlying mechanisms of racial, ethnic, and gender disparities in health and health care. She is committed to research that improves health in developing countries, and focuses primarily on how gender norms affect children’s well-being, reproductive health, and fertility. 

“Much of my research has taught me about the deep connections that exist between economics and human experience,” Oguz said. “My passion for the field comes from a desire to contribute to the well-being and happiness of others. I have found that students are also interested in academic and business careers that go beyond a discipline to make a positive difference in the world.”


Brent Driggers, Ph.D., is professor of new testament at Lenoir-Rhyne’s Lutheran Theological Southern Seminary in Columbia, South Carolina. He has been a professor at LTSS for more than a decade and serves as a Sunday school teacher and preacher at local congregations. 

Brent Driggers, Ph.D., professor of new testament at LTSS With a great love for the Christian theological tradition, Driggers works to empower his students by equipping them with an understanding of God’s love, how to find it in scripture, and communicate it to others. “I want my students to see how much the New Testament inspires and shapes who I am,” Driggers said. “I want them to see that these are not purely academic topics but living traditions that, when interpreted faithfully, shape us into the image of a loving God.” 

Driggers received an undergraduate degree in religion and English from Wake Forest University before earning a Master of Theological Studies degree at Duke University and a Master of Divinity degree and doctorate degree in New Testament at Princeton Theological Seminary in Princeton, New Jersey. He has published articles related to biblical studies and biblical theology, and regularly provides articles for academic and church-related publications. 

Much of the work Driggers requires of his students involves close analysis of passages in the New Testament Gospels. According to Driggers, students translate passages from the Greek language before analyzing the text with attention to narrative factors and relevant historical background. “With these assignments students begin to experience just how deep interpretation can go,” he said. “If they can learn to plumb the real depths of scripture, and to wrestle with its complexities and ambiguities, then they are on their way to mature pastoral ministry.”

 

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